TESTIMONY OF AMOS LEE EUINS

The President's Commission reconvened at 2:15 p.m.
The CHAIRMAN. The Commission will come to order.
Amos, will you stand up, please, and raise your right hand?
Do you solemnly swear the testimony you will give before this Commission will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. You may be seated. How old are you?
Mr. EUINS. Sixteen.
The CHAIRMAN. All right.
Mr. SPECTER. Mr. Chief Justice, should we start by reading the purpose?
The CHAIRMAN. Yes. I think you received a copy of this statement. But I just want to say to you that the purpose of today's hearing is to hear the testimony of Arnold Louis Rowland, James Richard Worrell, Robert H. Jackson, and yourself who were in the vicinity of the assassination scene on November 22, 1963. The Commission proposes to ask you facts concerning your knowledge of the assassination of President Kennedy. You understand that?
Mr. EUINS. Yes.
The CHAIRMAN. All right.
Mr. SPECTER. Would you tell us your full name for the record, please?
Mr. EUINS. Amos Lee Euins.
Mr. SPECTER. What is your exact date of birth, Amos?

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Mr. EUINS. January 10, 1948.
Mr. SPECTER. January 10, 1948?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. And are you a school boy at the present time?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. What school do you go to?
Mr. EUINS. Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Mr. SPECTER. What grade are you in at that school?
Mr. EUINS. The ninth.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you live with your parents, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. How is your health generally?
Mr. EUINS. I guess it is all right.
Mr. SPECTER. How are your eyes?
Mr. EUINS. They are all right.
Mr. SPECTER. Can you see good at a distance?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, I can see good at a distance, but I can't see at real close range.
Mr. SPECTER. Are you able to read without glasses?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. You don't use glasses for any purposes, then?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. When you say you have trouble at close range, just what do you mean by that?
Mr. EUINS. You know, like I put something on real close.
Mr. SPECTER. Indicating about 4 or 5 inches from your eyes?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. And then they kind of get dim. But on a long scene, I can see good.
Mr. SPECTER. How are your grades in school, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. They are all right.
Mr. SPECTER. Are they better than average, or what?
Mr. EUINS. They are about average.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Going back to November 22, 1963, that is last year, Amos, do you recall what you were doing early on that morning?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. When I first got up, I went to school. Then about 11:30, well, the teachers called us and told us the ones that wanted to go downtown to see the President come down to the office and get an excuse and they could go. So I went down to the office, and I got an excuse, so I went downtown.
Mr. SPECTER. And what time did you leave school?
Mr. EUINS. 11:30.
Mr. SPECTER. And where did you go from your school?
Mr. EUINS. Downtown.
Mr. SPECTER. What part of downtown?
Mr. EUINS. Right over by the county jail.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you know the names of those streets, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. If I told you they were Elm and Houston, would that help your memory as to what the names of those streets were?
Mr. EUINS. It was right by the freeway.
Mr. SPECTER. All right. Let me show you a photograph, Amos, which is on a document I have marked as Commission Exhibit No. 365.
(The document referred to was marked Commission Exhibit No. 365 for identification.)
Mr. SPECTER. Take just a minute and look at that, and see if you can recognize where that is.
Mr. EUINS. This is going across the railroad tracks, back up to here right here at the corner is the Book Depository Building.
Mr. SPECTER. That is the Book Depository Building, you say?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.

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Why don't you just put an "X" with this pencil on the Book Depository Building, as you identify it there, Amos--on the building itself.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. SPECTER. Now, were you somewhere in that area when the President's motorcade went by?
Mr. EUINS. I was right here.
Mr. SPECTER Why don't you take this black pencil and put an "A" right where you were, Amos.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. SPECTER. Now, what time did you get to the place where you have marked With an "A"?
Mr. EUINS. Oh, I would say around about 15 minutes or something like that to 12, because my mother brought me down there.
Mr. SPECTER. She drove you down, did she?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, were you with anybody when you came to that spot, or did your mother leave you off there by yourself?
Mr. EUINS. She left me. She had to go on to work.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, about how long was it after you got there that the motorcade came by?
Mr. EUINS. Oh, I would say about--I had been there about 15, maybe 20 minutes. It come around-the comer, come on around.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Amos, I want to show you another picture here that I have marked as Commission Exhibit No. 366.
(The document referred to was marked Commission Exhibit No. 366 for identification.)
Mr. SPECTER. I ask you if you can recognize what that building is.
Mr. EUINS. This here is the Book Depository Building.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Now, look back over here at 365. Can you tell us which direction the President's motorcade came from on this picture?
Mr. EUINS. It come from right in here.
Mr. SPECTER. First of all, do you know what the name of this street is? Would that be Main Street, in Dallas?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; I think so.
Mr. SPECTER. Coming down Main Street, indicating in a general westerly direction. Turning which way?
Mr. EUINS. This way.
Mr. SPECTER. Turned right.
Do you know if that is Houston Street?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I don't.
Mr. SPECTER. Let the record show the witness is identifying a street heretofore identified as Houston.
Then which way did the motorcade go after proceeding in a general northerly direction on Houston?
Mr. EUINS. It come this way, turn.
Mr. SPECTER. Which way--right or left?
Mr. EUINS. It turned to the left, coming down, going on.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you know the name of the street it turned onto when it made the left turn?
Mr. EUINS. I was just trying to keep an eye on the President.
Mr. SPECTER. The witness has identified a street heretofore identified as Elm Street.
Tell us what you saw as the motorcade went by.
Mr. EUINS. I was standing here on the comer. And then the President come around the corner right here. And I was standing here. And I was waving, because there wasn't hardly no one on the corner right there but me. I was waving. He looked that way and he waved back at me. And then I had seen a pipe, you know, up there in the window, I thought it was a pipe, some kind of pipe.
Mr. SPECTER. When had you first seen that thing you just described as a pipe?
Mr. EUINS. Right as he turned the corner here.

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Mr. SPECTER. Now, exactly where did you see that thing you have described as a pipe come from. And take a good look now before you tell us where it was.
Mr. EUINS. Right here.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, will you mark an "X" on Exhibit No. 366 where you saw the pipe? Mark the exact window, if you can, Amos.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Proceed to tell us what happened, Amos.
Mr. EUINS. Then I was standing here, and as the motorcade turned the corner, I was facing, looking dead at the building. And so I seen this pipe thing sticking out the window. I wasn't paying too much attention to it. Then when the first shot was fired, I started looking around, thinking it was a backfire. Everybody else started looking around. Then I looked up at the window, and he shot again. So--you know this fountain bench here, right around here. Well, anyway, there is a little fountain right here. I got behind this little fountain, and then he shot again.
So after he shot again, he just started looking down this, you know.
Mr. SPECTER. Who started looking down that way?
Mr. EUINS. The man in the window. I could see his hand, and I could see his other hand on the trigger, and one hand was on the barrel thing.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Now, at the time the second shot was fired, where were you looking then?
Mr. EUINS. I was still looking at the building, you know, behind this--I was looking at the building.
Mr. SPECTER. Looking at anything special in the building?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. I was looking where the barrel was sticking out.
Mr. SPECTER. How many shots did you hear altogether?
Mr. EUINS. I believe there was four, to be exact.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, where were you looking at the time of the third shot, if you remember?
Mr. EUINS. After he shot the first two times, I was just standing back here. And then after he shot again, he pulled the gun back in the window. And then all the police ran back over here in the track vicinity.
Mr. SPECTER. Slow down just a little bit in what you are telling us.
When the second shot occurred, were you still standing at the point where you marked with an "A" on 365?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. But I was right behind this little--
Mr. SPECTER. Were you a little bit behind of where that "A" is?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; right back here.
Mr. SPECTER. Let's mark that with a "B," where you were at the time the second shot occurred.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Now, when the third shot occurred, Amos, let me ask you again, where were you looking then?
Mr. EUINS. I was still down here, looking up at the building.
Mr. SPECTER. What did you see in the building?
Mr. EUINS. I seen a bald spot on this man's head, trying to look out the window. He had a bald spot on his head. I was looking at the bald spot. I could see his hand, you know the rifle laying across in his hand. And I could see his hand sticking out on the trigger part. And after he got through, he just pulled it back in the window.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you see him pull it back in the window?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. And were you still standing at point B?
Mr. EUINS. Yes.
Mr. SPECTER. When he pulled it back in the window?
Mr. EUINS. I was still behind here, yes.
Mr. SPECTER. Where were you when you heard what you described as the fourth shot?
Mr. EUINS. The first shot I was standing here.

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Mr. SPECTER. Now you are referring to 366. Put an "L" on 366 where you were standing at the first shot.
Mr. EUINS. Right here.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. EUINS. And then as I looked up there, you know, he fired another shot, you know, as I was looking. So I got behind this fountain thing right in there, at this point B.
Mr. SPECTER. At point B, on 365?
Mr. EUINS. I got behind there. And then I watched, he did fire again. Then he started looking down towards my way, and then he fired again.
Mr. SPECTER. The question I have for you now is where were you when he fired on that fourth time.
Mr. EUINS. I was still behind point B.
Mr. SPECTER. You were still at point B when he fired the fourth time?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. Then he pulled the gun back in the window.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you see him pull the gun back in the window after the fourth shot?
Mr. EUINS. Yes; he just come back like this.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you watch what he did after that?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; because after he had pulled it back in the window, I ran this way, and went across the tracks.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
You start on Exhibit 365, and put the black mark and show us the path of where you ran on 365.
Mr. EUINS. I was here at "B."
(At this point, Representative Ford entered the hearing room.)
(Witness marking.)
Mr. EUINS. I was coming down like this here, and there was a policeman, you know there is a little cut you can come through there. There was a policeman standing right around here.
Mr. SPECTER. Where was the policeman standing? Mark that with point "C," Amos.
Mr. EUINS. Right there.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. SPECTER. You ran past the policeman standing at point C?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir. You see, I come from point B, and ran here, and told the policeman I had seen the shot, because they were looking at the railroad tracks. So he put me on the cycle and he went to here.
Mr. SPECTER. He put you on the cycle and took you where?
Mr. EUINS. Up to the front of the building.
Mr. SPECTER. The Texas School Book Depository Building?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; and then he called some more cars. They got all around the building. And then the policemen came from the tracks, and they got around the building.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you see the policemen come from the tracks to go around the building?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. About how many policemen were there, would you say, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. There was about 14 or something like that. They were coming from the tracks here.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you know what the name of that policeman was, who was in that position where you have marked C?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir. He was kind of an old policeman. I ran down and got him. And he ran up here.
Mr. SPECTER. You mean--
Mr. EUINS. The Book Depository Building.
Then he called some more cars. They got all the way around the building. And then after that, well, he seen another man. Another man told him he seen a man run out the back.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you know who that man was who said somebody ran out the back?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir. He was a construction man working back there.

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Mr. SPECTER. Were you there when the man talked about somebody running out the back?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. He said the man had--he said he had kind of bald spot on his head. And he said the man come back there.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you know what the name of the man was who told the police that someone had run out the back?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. What did you do next, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. So then they took me over to the county jail. And that is where I told them what happened. And then they was standing around the Book Depository Building, and I stayed over there to the jailhouse about 6 o'clock. And then they took me home.
Mr. SPECTER. And did they question you about what happened and what you observed on that occasion?
Mr. EUINS. At the jailhouse?
Mr. SPECTER. At the jailhouse.
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Amos, would you tell us everything that you can remember about what you saw about the gun itself?
Mr. EUINS. Well, when I first got here on the corner, the President was coming around the bend. That is when--I was looking at the building then.
Mr. SPECTER. What did you think it was when you first saw it?
Mr. EUINS. I thought it was a piece of pipe or something sticking out the window.
Mr. SPECTER. Did it look like it was a piece of metal to you?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; just a little round piece of pipe.
Mr. SPECTER. About an inch in diameter, would you say?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. And how long was the piece of pipe that you saw?
Mr. EUINS. It was sticking out about that much.
Mr. SPECTER. About 14 or 15 inches?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. And then after I seen it sticking out, after awhile, that is when I heard the shot, and everybody started looking around.
Mr. SPECTER. At that time, Amos, did you see anything besides the end of the pipe?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. For example, you didn't see anything about a stock or any other part of the rifle?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir--not with the first shot. You see, the President was still right along down in here somewhere on the first shot.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, when you saw it on the first occasion, did you think it was a rifle then? Or did that thought enter your mind?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I wasn't thinking about it then. But when I was looking at it, when he shot, it sounded like a high-powered rifle, after I listened to it awhile, because I had been in the NDCC for about a year.
Mr. SPECTER. What is NDCC?
Mr. EUINS. We call it a military army for the boys, at our school.
Mr. SPECTER. Is that ROTC?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. ROTC. And have you had any opportunity to fire a weapon in that ROTC class?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; not outside of just .22's. We fire them on the firing range.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Now, when you looked up at the rifle later, you described seeing some of the trigger part.
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, describe as fully as you can for us what you saw then, Amos.
Mr. EUINS. Well, when he stuck it out, you know--after the President had

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come on down the street further, you know he kind of stuck it out more, you know.
Mr. SPECTER. How far was it sticking out of the window would you say then, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. I would say it was about something like that.
Mr. SPECTER. Indicating about 3 feet?
Mr. EUINS. You know--the trigger housing and stock and receiver group out the window.
Mr. SPECTER. I can't understand you, Amos.
Mr. EUINS. It was enough to get the stock and receiving house and the trigger housing to stick out the window.
Mr. SPECTER. The stock and receiving house?
Mr. EUINS. Yes.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, what direction was the rifle pointing?
Mr. EUINS. Down--what did you says Elm?
Mr. SPECTER. Elm Street?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; down Elm.
Mr. SPECTER. Was it pointing in the direction of the President?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, could you see anything else on the gun?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I could not.
Mr. SPECTER. For example, could you see whether or not there was a telescopic lens on the gun?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, is there anything else about the gun that you can describe to us that you have not already told us about?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, what kind of a look, if any, did you have at the man who was there?
Mr. EUINS. All I got to see was the man with a spot in his head, because he had his head something like this.
Mr. SPECTER. Indicating his face down, looking down the rifle?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir: and I could see the spot on his head.
Mr. SPECTER. How would you describe that man for us?
Mr. EUINS. I wouldn't know how to describe him, because all I could see was the spot and his hand.
Mr. SPECTER. Was he slender or was he fat?
Mr. EUINS. I didn't get to see him.
Mr. SPECTER. Could you tell from where you looked whether he was tall or short?
Mr. EUINS. No.
Mr. SPECTER. Of what race was he, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. I couldn't tell, because these boxes were throwing a reflection, shaded.
Mr. SPECTER. Could you tell whether he was a Negro gentleman or a white man?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Couldn't even tell that? But you have described that he had a bald--
Mr. EUINS. Spot in his head. Yes, sir; I could see the bald spot in his head.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, could you tell what color hair he had?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Could you tell whether his hair was dark or light?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. How far back did the bald spot on his head go?
Mr. EUINS. I would say about right along in here.
Mr. SPECTER. Indicating about 2 1/2 inches above where you hairline is. Is that about what you are saying?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; right along in here.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, did you get a very good look at that man, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I did not.
Mr. SPECTER. Were you able to tell anything about the clothes he was wearing?
Mr. EUINS: No, sir.

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Mr. SPECTER. Now, when you were at the sheriff's department in the police station that you have described, did they ask you to sign an affidavit or statement for them, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. I now show you a paper, Amos, which I have marked as Commission Exhibit No. 367.
(The document referred to was marked Commission Exhibit No. 367 for identification.)
Mr. SPECTER. This is supposed to be a statement which is signed. Let me first point out to you that it is a copy of it. I ask you if this is a copy of your signature?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Now, will you take your time, Amos, and read that over, and then I want to ask you a couple of questions about it.
Did you have a chance to read it over?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
Let me ask you about a couple of specific things here, Amos.
In the statement you say here that he was a white man. By reading the statement, does that refresh your memory as to whether he was a white man or not?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I told the man that I could see a white spot on his head, but I didn't actually say it was a white man. I said I couldn't tell. But I saw a white spot in his head.
Mr. SPECTER. Your best recollection at this moment is you still don't know whether he was a white man or a Negro? All you can say is that you saw a white spot on his head?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Then, did you tell the people at the police station that he was a white man, or did they make a mistake when they wrote that down here?
Mr. EUINS. They must have made a mistake, because I told them I could see a white spot on his head.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, is there anything else in this statement, Amos. which is different from the way you remember this event, as you are sitting here right now?
Amos, did you understand the last question?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you answer it for us?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I don't think there is.
Mr. SPECTER. I don't understand you, Amos. The question I am trying to get at it, as you read that statement over now, you have testified or told us here today what you remember about this assassination?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. And I am asking you, when you read that statement over, is there anything on that statement which you think is wrong, based on what you remember right now?
For example, you told us that they were wrong when they wrote down that you identified him as a white man. Were they wrong about anything else that they wrote down?
Mr. EUINS. Not that I can see.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.
When you looked up and saw this man, Amos, did he have on a hat?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you notice any boxes behind him at that time, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir; there were some boxes, you know, all the side of the window. Like this window--there were some boxes in these windows up here.
Mr. SPECTER. You saw some boxes in these windows?
Mr. EUINS. In these windows, and these windows, and there was boxes in half of this one.
Mr. SPECTER. All right.

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Now, mark the windows where you saw those boxes, Amos. Start off with--mark the window "Y" where you saw boxes.
(Witness marking.)
Mr. SPECTER. You made a figure 9, as I read it, on the two places you saw in the windows.
EUINS. Yes, sir: in this half.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, were there boxes in the window marked "X"?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir. There were about two or three of them right along--
Mr. SPECTER. Indicating the middle dividing line there?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Was that window marked "X" opened, Amos, or closed?
Mr. EUINS. It was open.
Mr. SPECTER. How far open was it?
Mr. EUINS. About that high.
Mr. SPECTER. Indicating about 19 inches?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. And was the window in the other double window immediately next to the window marked "X" open or closed?
Mr. EUINS. The top window, on the sixth floor?
Mr. SPECTER. I am referring to the window right next to it.
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; it was not open.
Mr. SPECTER. Amos, when you heard the first shot, did you have any reaction or impression as to where the noise was coming from at that exact time?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; not at the exact time. You know, because everybody else started looking around. So I just started looking around, thinking it was a backfire, just like everyone else.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you look up towards that window before the second shot, or just when the second shot occurred?
Mr. EUINS. I think--just a little before, because as soon as I did, I looked at it--pow.
Mr. SPECTER. You heard a pow?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, as you were watching and heard, did you have the impression that the noise you heard was coming from that rifle?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I didn't, because I wasn't thinking of the rifle at flint--you know, because it looked like a pipe at first.
Mr. SPECTER. When you say the second--when you heard the second shot, when you say you were looking at the rifle, did you have the feeling that the noise came from the rifle when you heard the second shot, when you were looking at it?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; I did not.
Mr. SPECTER. Well, did you have any impression at all about where the noise was coming from?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir; not on the first shot.
Mr. SPECTER. How about the second shot?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Where did you think the noise was coming from on the second shot?
Mr. EUINS. I seen him shoot on the second shot.
Mr. SPECTER. So you thought the noise was coming from the rifle on the second shot?
Mr. EUINS. Yes, sir.
Mr. CHAIRMAN. Did you say you thought, or saw?
Mr. EUINS. I saw him shoot the second shot.
Mr. SPECTER. How high were those boxes behind him, Amos?
Mr. EUINS. They was probably about 2 feet high stacked in the back of him.
Mr. SPECTER. Amos, were you questioned later by the FBI?
Mr. EUINS. Yes. sir; over in the office.
Mr. SPECTER. How many times were you questioned by the FBI?
Mr. EUINS. Oh, once.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you remember when that was?

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Mr. EUINS. It was around about 2 or 3 o'clock.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you remember how many days after the assassination it was?
Mr. EUINS. About 4.
Mr. SPECTER. You think they might have talked to you more than once?
Mr. EUINS. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Mr. Chief Justice, I move for the admission into evidence of the statement marked Commission Exhibit 367.
The CHAIRMAN. That may be admitted.
(The document heretofore marked for identification as Commission Exhibit No. 367 was received in evidence.)
Mr. SPECTER. That concludes the questioning I have, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. Mr. Wright?
Mr. WRIGHT. Nothing further, Mr. Chief Justice.
Mr. SPECTER. Mr. Chief Justice, I would like to move for the admission into evidence of all the exhibits here--365, 366, as well as 367.
The CHAIRMAN. Very well.
(The documents heretofore marked for identification as Commission Exhibits Nos. 365 and 366. were received in evidence.)
The CHAIRMAN. Amos, you may be excused, then. Thank you very much for coming and helping us out with your testimony.
We will recess until tomorrow morning at 9 o'clock.